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3 edition of commentary of Pappus on book x of Euclid"s Elements found in the catalog.

commentary of Pappus on book x of Euclid"s Elements

Pappus of Alexandria

commentary of Pappus on book x of Euclid"s Elements

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Published by Johnson Reprint Corp. in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Euclid

  • Edition Notes

    Issued originally as vol. 8 of the Harvard Semitic series.

    StatementArabic text and translation by William Thomson; with introductory remarks, notes, and glossary of technical terms by Gustav Junge and William Thomson. Cambridge, Harvard university press, 1930.
    SeriesHarvard Semitic series -- v. 8.
    ContributionsThomson, William, 1886-, Junge, Gustav, 1879-
    The Physical Object
    Pagination294 p.
    Number of Pages294
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL13581714M
    OCLC/WorldCa2026830


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commentary of Pappus on book x of Euclid"s Elements by Pappus of Alexandria Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Commentary Of PappusOn Book X Of Euclids Elements [Junge, Gustav, William., Thomson] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The Commentary Of PappusOn Book X Of Euclids ElementsAuthor: Gustav Junge, Thomson William. THE COMMENTARY OF PAPPUS ON BOOK X OF EUCLID'S ELEMENTS Hardcover – January 1, by William Thomson (Author) See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions.

Price New from Used from Author: William Thomson. Get this from a library. The commentary of Pappus on book x of Euclid's Elements. [Pappus, of Alexandria.; William Thomson; Gustav Junge] -- Arabic text [the version of Abu 'Uthmān Sa'īd b.

Ya'k̇ūb al-Dimashk̇ī] and translation by William Thomson. With introductory remarks, notes, and a glossary of technical terms by Gustav Junge and.

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Pappus, of Alexandria. Commentary of Pappus on book x of Euclid's Elements. New York, Johnson Reprint Corp., []. PAPPUS COMMENTARY ON EUCLID PAPPUS' COMMENTARY ON EUCLID The Commentary of Pappus on Book X of Euclid1 s Elements, Arabic text and translation.

By William Thomson, with introductory remarks, notes, and a glossary of technical terms by Gustav Junge and William Thomson. Cambridge, Mass., Harvard University Press, pp. The Commentary of Pappus on Book X of Euclid's Elements (Harvard Semitic series) by of Alexandria Pappus, William Thomson, et al.

| 1 Jan Unknown Binding. The Elements-- Book II Proof. Let A and BC be the two lines. Make the random commentary of Pappus on book x of Euclids Elements book at D and E. Let BF be drawn perpendicular to BC and cut at G so that BG is the same as A.

Complete the diagram as shown. Then BH is equal to BK, DL, EH. Now argue that the whole is the sum of the parts. The Elements-- Book Commentary of Pappus on book x of Euclids Elements book II 1 Throughout this article EE x.y refers to Prop osition y in Book x in Euclid’s Elements.

Howev er, EE x.y + and EE x.y − are closely related statements that do not appear in the Elements. Full text of "Euclid's Elements of geometry [book11,12] with explanatory notes; together with a " See other formats. Full text of "The Thirteen Books Of Euclids Elements" See other formats. Little is known of Euclid's life.

According to Proclus ( A.D.) in his Commentary on the First Book of Euclid's Elements, he came after the first pupils of Plato and lived during the reign of Ptolemy I ( B.C.). [] Pappus of Alexandria (fl. A.D.) in his Collection states that Apollonius of Perga ( B.C.) studied for a long while in that city under the pupils of Euclid.

Boetius (about 50o A.D.) is said to have trans lated the Elements into Latin, but the geometry of the Pseudo Boetius which we possess contains no more than fragments of such a translation (the definitions of book i., the postulates and axioms, the enunciations of the propositions of book i.

and of some propositions of books ii., iii., iv., but. Commentary of Pappus on book x of Euclids Elements book (/ ˈ juː k l ɪ d /; Ancient Greek: Εὐκλείδης – Eukleídēs, pronounced [ː.dɛːs]; fl. BC), sometimes called Euclid of Alexandria to distinguish him from Euclid of Megara, was a Greek mathematician, often referred to as the "founder of geometry" or the "father of geometry".

He was active in Alexandria during the reign of Ptolemy I (– BC).Known for: Euclidean geometry, Euclid's. Euclid's Elements is without commentary of Pappus on book x of Euclids Elements book a true masterpiece of Western civilization.

It is one of the most widely disseminated and most influential books of all time. A fundamental landmark of mathematical achievement, the Elements is profoundly important for several distinct reasons. Firstly, it is a compendium of the principal mathematical work undertaken in classical Brand: Barnes & Noble.

euclid and the traditions about him. chapter ii. euclid's other works. chapter iii. greek commentators on the elements other than proclus.

chapter iv. proclus and his sources. chapter v. the text. chapter vi. the scholia. chapter vii. euclid in arabia. chapter viii. principal translations and editions of the elements. chapter ix. book i. book. Gerard also contributed to the literature of Euclides Latinus by translating the commentary of al-Nayrīzī on the Elements, the commentary of Muḥammad ibn ʿAbd al-Bāqī (fl.

) on book X, and at least part of Dimashqīʾs translation of Pappus’ commentary on book X. A Greek version of the commentary was appended to Simon Grynäus' edition of Euclid's Elements, published at Basle in (displayed in center case).

This first Latin edition was edited with commentary by Francesco Barozzi (floria t ), who also translated the works of Heron, Pappus and Archimedes. Junge noticed this problem (see The Commentary of pappus on Book X of Euclid's Elements, W.

Thomson & G. Junge, Eds., Harvard Univ. Press,n. with thanks to Wilbur Knorr for this reference); and these observations strengthening Props.

66 to 70 are due to Mueller; (see his [, and ). Cited by: 6. EUCLID, fl. BCE1 The name Euclid is known to almost every high school student as the author of The Elements, the long studied treatise on geometry and number theory. No other book except the Bible has been so widely translated and Size: KB.

The Commentary of Pappus on Book X of Euclids Elements. (Harvard Semitic Series VIII.) by Gustav Junge, William Thomson (pp. ) Review by: Theodor Seif. The Commentary of Pappus on Book X of Euclid’s Elements, edited and translated by G. Junge and W. Thomson. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press.

Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press. The Commentary of Pappus on Book X of Euclid's Elements, edited and translated by G. Junge and W. Thomson. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press. the commentary of pappus on book x of euclid's elements london: humphrey milford oxford university press the commentary of pappus on book x of euclid's elements.

arabic text and translation liy. william thomson with. introductory remarks, notes, and a glossary of technical terms hy. gustav junge and william thomson. Euclid's ‘Elements’ has been one of the great formative works in the history of mankind and it would be reasonable to expect that it would have some influence upon architecture.

Stoicheion Bibl. XV Ek ton Theonos Synousion. Proklou bibl. IV by EUCLID and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at   Euclid wrote the oldest math textbook that we know about, called The Elements.

The book was compiled over many years and had contributions from many mathematicians, but Euclid wrote it up around BCE. das X. Bueh der Elemente Euklids, fast Jahre nach Theaetet entstanden, liegt uns nicht in griechischer Sprache, sondern nur in einer arabischen tJbersetzung vor, von der es t)bersetzungen durch Fr.

Woepcke4, H. Suter5 und insbesondere eine engUsche "Qber setzung durch W. Thomson mit einer deutschen Einleitung von G. Junge6 gibt. When I was in high school, I eventually learned about the mathematical subject known as geometry. Unlike most schools though, instead of our teacher having us sit down and listen to them talk about the subject, our teacher had each and every one of us go to the library and rent a copy of Euclid’s Elements (Book 1).

From that point on till the end of the first semester, each. About pythagorus theorem 1. AboutPythagorean theoremInterestSee also: Pythagorean trigonometric identityThe Pythagorean theorem: The sum of the areas of the two squares on the legs (a andb) equals the area of the squareon the hypotenuse (c).In mathematics, the Pythagorean theorem — or Pythagoras theorem — is a relation in Euclideangeometry.

Proclus introduces Euclid only briefly in his fifth-century Commentary on the Elements, as the author of Elements, that he was mentioned by Archimedes, and that when King Ptolemy asked if there was an easier path to learning geometry than Elements, Euclid replied, "Sire, there is no Royal Road to Geometry."[cite this quote] Although the.

An anonymous commentary on Euclid's Elements, preserved in two manuscripts in Hyderabad, India, presents an interesting example of a mathematical commentary composed almost entirely from quotations drawn from earlier author most frequently used is al-Anṭākī.

Several other commentators are named – Ibn al-Haytham and al-Nayrīzī are frequently Author: Gregg De Young.

they are explicitly accepted in the fundamental commentary by Proclus to Euclid’s Book I, where all the remaining statements included as axioms by Pappus and others are rejected as spurious additions. We consider the ve principles on a par, since all of them can be viewed asbasic assumptions for any reasonable theory of magnitudes.

Designed to inform readers about the formal development of Euclidean geometry and to prepare prospective high school mathematics instructors to teach Euclidean geometry, this text closely follows Euclids classic, Elements.

The text augments Euclids statements with appropriate historical commentary and many exercises — more than 1, practice. Euclid's Elements, written about B.C., a comprehensive treatise on geometry, proportions, and the theory of numbers, is the most long-lived of all mathematical works.

This manuscript preserves an early version of the text. Shown here is Book I Proposit the Pythagorean Theorem: the square on the hypotenuse of a right triangle is equal to the sum of the squares.

A subsequent proposition,reappears in the commentary to Book 6 of the Almagest (Rome, pp. ); this theorem uses the lemma too, and in the commentary to Book 6. The Collection, Pappus' most important treatise, contained eight Books, but the first Book and the first part of the second Book are now lost" (Boyer, A History of Mathematics p.

"Each book (8) is preceded by general reflexions which give to that group of problems its philosophical and historical setting. So in that sense the author of the Elements wasn't just one person. But there almost certainly was an actual Euclid who wrote the bulk of what's come down to us as The Elements.

Pappus and Proclus both discuss him as an actual person, and while they lived several centuries after The Elements were written, we know they were drawing from near.

Its arrival online overshadows everything else in the following list, even the unique Vatican Pappus, Mathematical Collections BooksVat.by another Greek mathematician of vast stature, the 4th-century-CE writer Pappus. Every other Pappus in the world depends on this incomplete Rome copy, and as you can see, Book 1 is forever lost.

Heron of Alexandria, also called Hero, (flourished c. ad 62, Alexandria, Egypt), Greek geometer and inventor whose writings preserved for posterity a knowledge of the mathematics and engineering of Babylonia, ancient Egypt, and the Greco-Roman world. Heron’s most important geometric work, Metrica, was lost until It is a compendium, in three books, of geometric.

The principal room proportions in Villa Emo may be related to these notes in the Pythagorean scale: On either side of the casa domenicale at Villa Emo are the farm buildings. Here the room sizes are 48 x 20, (), 20 x 12, (), and 24 x 20, ().Cited by:.

His book on spheres gives indications of what theorems were well known in pdf day. Euclid (ca. to Pdf is known for his book 'Elements of Geometry', which deduced many mathematical principles from a small set of 'axioms'.

For 2, years that book had no peer as an introduction to and reference work on geometry.The Commentary of Pappus on Book X of Euclid's Elements. Cambridge pp. Repr. (Islamic Mathematics and Astronomy. 16). ISBN € 33,00 / 49,Alexander Jones () Book 7 of the Ebook, part 1: introduction, text, translation ISBNpart 2: commentary, index, figures ISBNSpringer-Verlag.

J. L. Heiberg's Litterargeschichtliche Studien über Euklid (Leipzig, ) A valuable chapter on porisms (from a philological standpoint) is included. August : Djyu.